#Repost @theroadhere ・・・ Fanny and Stella (also known as Boulton and Park) were two Victorian cross-dressers, who shot to national attention as a result of their infamous court trial of 1871. . Having left the humdrum of their middle class homes behind, Fanny and Stella performed as a popular theatrical double act in Essex and Scarborough, and enjoyed wandering the West End dressed as women. . In 1870, their nighttime antics attracted police attention, and the pair were arrested on suspicion of conspiring to commit sodomy. “On the night they were arrested, they had caused a sensation at the Strand theatre. They strolled about as though they owned the place, winking at men in the stalls from their box, lighting their cigarettes from the gas lamps…they had also been thrown out of the fashionable Burlington Arcade several times for ‘chirruping’ at men” (H.G. Cocks). Their hijinks challenged strict Victorian morals, whilst (in the police’s eyes) their effeminacy alone was taken as sure evidence that they were “sodomites”. . In the trial that followed (attended by a huge number of spectators), the prosecution refused to allow Fanny and Stella to change out of their women’s clothing before taking the dock. And, “with wigs slipping and stubble poking through, it was pretty clear to the packed and panting courtroom that the two tarts were actually young men” (The Guardian). . Despite such tactics, the prosecution failed. They were unable to prove that ‘the unnatural offence’ had been committed and – as cross-dressing wasn’t a crime – Fanny and Stella were allowed to walk free. (Image: rictonnorton.co.uk). . #lgbtq🌈 #lgbtq #lgbtqhistory #haveprideinhistory #queer #queerhistory #queerhistorymatters #queerpride #queers #queerculture #queerphotography #vintage #vintagequeer #queervintage #drag #dragqueen #dragqueensofinstagram #dragqueens #butchqueen #crossdresser

from Instagram: https://ift.tt/2lQhoft #Repost @theroadhere
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Fanny and Stella (also known as Boulton and Park) were two Victorian cross-dressers, who shot to national attention as a result of their infamous court trial of 1871.
.
Having left the humdrum of their middle class homes behind, Fanny and Stella performed as a popular theatrical double act in Essex and Scarborough, and enjoyed wandering the West End dressed as women.
.
In 1870, their nighttime antics attracted police attention, and the pair were arrested on suspicion of conspiring to commit sodomy. “On the night they were arrested, they had caused a sensation at the Strand theatre. They strolled about as though they owned the place, winking at men in the stalls from their box, lighting their cigarettes from the gas lamps…they had also been thrown out of the fashionable Burlington Arcade several times for ‘chirruping’ at men” (H.G. Cocks). Their hijinks challenged strict Victorian morals, whilst (in the police’s eyes) their effeminacy alone was taken as sure evidence that they were “sodomites”.
.
In the trial that followed (attended by a huge number of spectators), the prosecution refused to allow Fanny and Stella to change out of their women’s clothing before taking the dock. And, “with wigs slipping and stubble poking through, it was pretty clear to the packed and panting courtroom that the two tarts were actually young men” (The Guardian).
.
Despite such tactics, the prosecution failed. They were unable to prove that ‘the unnatural offence’ had been committed and – as cross-dressing wasn’t a crime – Fanny and Stella were allowed to walk free. (Image: rictonnorton.co.uk).
.
#lgbtq🌈 #lgbtq #lgbtqhistory #haveprideinhistory #queer #queerhistory #queerhistorymatters #queerpride #queers #queerculture #queerphotography #vintage #vintagequeer #queervintage #drag #dragqueen #dragqueensofinstagram #dragqueens #butchqueen #crossdresser